Interview with Allison Montgomery from L3Harris Technologies

Allison Montgomery is the Global Senior Director of Environmental, Health and Safety for L3Harris  Technologies. She is based at L3Harris’ Corporate Headquarters in Melbourne, FL and is responsible for developing strategies to improve the company’s overall Environmental, Health and Safety performance. Before joining L3Harris, Allison worked at Pentair as the Global Director of EHS and Quality and held varying EHS Management roles with Alcoa, Inc. Allison served four years in the United States Marine Corps. She holds a BS degree in Biology from The Ohio State University and a MS degree in Environmental Management from The University of Maryland.

Interviewer: “As an expert in the health and safety sector, what do you feel businesses continue to get wrong when it comes to their Health and Safety strategy?”
Allison: “Differentiating between tactical and strategical safety and then resourcing that accordingly.  Businesses should spend time prioritizing EHS efforts based on impact and risk and then dedicate resources appropriately. EHS resources tend to be lean at most organizations, which is usually why EHS needs a strong operational partner.  Utilization of resources effectively will ensure that both tactical safety (focused on by operations) and strategic safety (focused on by EHS) are both accounted for.   Knowing what to impact and focusing on strategy and system-based safety will bring the most value to an organization that they can sustain.  It doesn’t mean that tactical EHS doesn’t happen, it just means that responsibility for tactical EHS is shared by EVERYONE and it continually evolves based on strategy.  By focusing on setting up your employees to be successful and safe from their first day at work, you see benefits down the road with a safe and proactive culture.”

Interviewer: “Where do you see the industry headed within the next one to five years and what do you feel will be the biggest game changers?”
Allison: “In the next several years, the integration of technology into everyday EHS will continue to grow and evolve. Leaders will expect instant data that is trended and available for them to make decisions that will guide their daily activities. As EHS professionals, we will need to ensure integration and cohesiveness of systems is a priority.”

Interviewer: “What advice would you give to someone trying to excel in the health & safety industry?”
Allison: “As you progress in your career, your softer skills like; political savviness, team building, managing conflict and concise communication will outweigh the importance of technical skills. Knowing this, your focus on developing and honing these softer skills will require your time and attention. Keep up with your technical training, but don’t forget the softer skill set, it will take you further in the long run.”

Interviewer: “What is one key takeaway you hope our OHS audience leaves with after hearing your presentation on-site?”
Allison: “A key takeaway I would like to leave everyone with is that related and overlapping functions, like medical and workers compensation, can be seamlessly integrated into EHS. This integration allows for a strong team approach to managing EHS and also ensuring that you have the full picture of an employee’s health from initial injury to return to work.” 

About LT3 Harris Technologies

L3Harris is an agile global aerospace and defense technology innovator, delivering end-to-end solutions that meet customers’ mission-critical needs. We provide advanced defense and commercial technologies across air, land, sea, space and cyber domains. They bring speed, innovation and flawless execution together with our commitment to make the world safer and more secure.

Interview with Robert Emery from The University of Texas School of Public Health

Dr. Robert Emery is Vice President for Safety, Health, Environment & Risk Management for The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston and Professor of Occupational Health at the University of Texas School of Public Health.

Interviewer: “What do you feel are the biggest challenges safety leaders are currently faced with?” 
Robert: “Successful safety programs function largely in the realm of prevention, so on a good day “nothing happens”. But safety programs need to improve their ability to articulate the amount of resources and commitment needed to “make nothing happen”.”

Interviewer: “What is the best piece of advice you have received within your job over the years?”
Robert: “One of my bosses told me “I don’t get paid to listen to complaints: if you have a problem, come in with three options and put yours at the top, and most likely you’ll get your way”.”

Interviewer: “What do you feel is the hottest topic right now in the industry and what is its effect on the industry?”
Robert: “The issue of total worker health is gaining traction. The notion that workers only have one body and it is either at work or at home – and that employers are going to pay for health-related issues either through workers comp insurance or health insurance – so it is in everyone’s best interest to understand this.”

 

Interviewer: “What do you feel the most passionate about within your business?”
Robert: “There is no more noble cause than protecting the health and safety of a person’s whose name you may never know”

About The University of Texas School of Public Health

At six campuses across Texas, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health works to improve the state of public health in Texas every day. Each of their campuses is strategically placed to meet the public health education and research needs of the diverse populations across Texas. UTHealth School of Public Health is the only school of public health in the nation with regional campuses.

Interview with John Green from AECON

John Green, has worked in the oil, gas, petrochemical, electronics, heavy engineering, construction and aviation sectors and has 40 years’ experience of industrial safety. He is recognised and respected as someone who does safety differently and as major force for change in how industrial safety is delivered. He has spent periods living and working overseas with in the Middle East, Iran, Europe, Hong Kong, New Zealand, parts of the USA and returned from a 4-year spell in Australia covering major construction operations in the southern hemisphere before moving to Canada in 2018.

He has held senior positions with Motorola, British Airways and Board level positions with McAlpine, Laing O’Rourke, Battersea Power Station Development Company and is currently the SVP and CSO for Aecon.

He spends any spare time that he has climbing in Europe and scuba diving across the world or any other pastime that requires exceptional risk management skills.

Interviewer: “What do you feel are the biggest challenges safety leaders are currently faced with?”
John: “I think that we have been tied into orthodox thinking in safety that we have almost become blind to alternatives and ignorant of the fact that the traditional approach is no longer working for us. We lack the skills to influence those at the top of the need for change and the abilities to coordinate that change effort with other business initiatives. That is partly an educational challenge but it’s also an issue when it comes to deciding what other characteristics we need safety people and leaders to have. The world of work has changed enormously in the last few decades but we still see safety as a simple, common sense issue when, in fact, its messy and complex”

Interviewer: “As an expert in the health and safety sector, what do you feel businesses continue to get wrong when it comes to their Health and Safety strategy?”
John: “I think everyone approaches this with the right attitude. Organisations want to get this right, but they fail because they disconnect the Safety strategy from almost all other aspects of the business. That and the fact that most strategies and based on a flawed notion of what safety truly is.”

Interviewer: “What is the best piece of advice you have received within your job over the years?”
John: People don’t come to work to be safe, they come to work to be successful

Interviewer: “What is one key takeaway you hope our audience at the OHS Leaders Summit USA leaves with after hearing your presentation on site?”
John: “That there is an alternative approach. One which enables everyone in the organisation to contribute to the success of the enterprise which includes the safety effort. The growth of bureaucracy is not inevitable and that there are mechanisms to enable safety that don’t involve control and constraint. Finally, that the future for EHS can be bright but we must realise that we need to change.”

About AECON

For more than a century, Aecon and its predecessor companies have helped to build many of Canada’s most famous landmarks – from the CN Tower and St. Lawrence Seaway, to the Vancouver Sky Train and Halifax Shipyards. In addition to these great landmarks, they’ve also helped to build hundreds of factories, roads, sewers, theatres, book stores, power plants, arts centres, mine sites, offices, hotels and gas distribution networks – the smaller, but no less important projects that help to make Canada a great place to live.

Interview with Barbara Veith from Fruit of the Loom

Barbara Veith, Director Environmental, Health & Safety for Fruit of the Loom, Inc. is responsible for providing expertise and strategic leadership for the global company environmental, health and safety programs and initiatives to ensure proper compliance and optimization within established regulations and guidelines and to maintain our program to communicate critical business information to participating employees in the event of business interruptions, threats or critical events.  Barbara is an Authorized 10 and 30-hour General Industry Trainer and an American Red Cross Instructor.

Interviewer: “What do you feel are the biggest challenges safety leaders are currently faced with within their business?”

Barbara: “Increasing the engagement process with temporary contract employees that lack experience and understanding of safety and don’t believe it is a value to them or that it is their responsibility.”

Interviewer: “As a safety leader, what do you feel businesses continue to get wrong when it comes to their marketing strategy?”

Barbara: “Unintentionally failing to develop or consider more forward-looking safety process improvements.  Just because you haven’t had any injuries, doesn’t mean you can’t improve the safety process.”

Interviewer: “What are the latest trends and behaviours you predict will be surfacing on the market over the coming 12 months?”

Barbara: “More programmable self-driven powered industrial trucks used for picking in warehousing and better communication systems for alerting employees of dangerous situations, such as active shooters.”

Interviewer: “What is the best piece of advice you have received within your job over the years?”

Barbara: “You must care and be passionate about safety, even if the employee forgets.  This isn’t just a job.”

About Fruit of the Loom 

Fruit of the Loom, Inc., is a global pioneer, specializing in the design, manufacture, and marketing of iconic family apparel, athletic apparel, and sporting equipment brands including Vanity Fair®, Fruit of the Loom®, Spalding® and Russell Athletic®. Our brands practice the relentless pursuit of better, by striving to create innovative apparel and equipment that fits well, feels great and helps make amazing things possible. We actively seek ways to be best-in-class in social and environmental responsibility in the communities it serves around the world. Fruit of the Loom, Inc., is a wholly owned subsidiary of Berkshire Hathaway.  For more information, visit fotlinc.com.

 

Interview with Paul Gooch from Consolidated Grain & Barge

Paul Gooch has 22 years’ experience in safety and also has experience working in public transportation, trucking, construction, and the grain industry.

Paul is currently the Safety Director for Consolidated Grain & Barge and has been with the company for 9 nine years.  He has two direct reports and six indirect reports.  The company has about 110 locations, mainly in the central US.

Interviewer: “What do you feel are the biggest challenges safety leaders are currently faced with within their business?”
Paul: “Speaking for the competitive construction industry, the top three (3) would be; first, resources, followed by resources, with resources being a close third.”

Interviewer: “As a safety leader, what do you feel businesses continue to get wrong when it comes to their Health and Safety strategy?”
Paul: Unknowingly and unintentionally reinforcing the wrong behaviors. For example, recently we had a manager visit a project and was pleasantly surprised to find all the work was proceeding ahead of schedule. The manager treated the employees to a lunch off site praising them for their efforts and told them resoundingly and in no uncertain terms, “Whatever you are doing, keep it up!”.

Unfortunately, the crew was limiting their breaktimes to keep ahead of the schedule. As the weather changed from warm to hot, the crew, reinforced by the managers praise, continue to maintain the pace.

On one of the warmest days of the year, one of the employees became dehydrated and began to show signs of heat stress. Fortunately, the other crew members were able to quickly provide cooling and first aid and prevent a serious health issue.

Interviewer: “What are the latest trends and behaviours you predict will be surfacing on the market over the coming 12 months?”
Paul: “Rethinking of the traditional observation and feedback processes to include less structure and more conversation to uncover organizational, process and system weaknesses, a resurgence in focus group based cultural assessments over the current “surveys” to allow for probing questioning, and more technology based tools for millennials.”

Interviewer: “What is the best piece of advice you have received within your job over the years?”
Paul: “Don’t do this as a job, do it because you care!”

Interviewer: “What is one key takeaway you hope audience from the OHS Leaders Summit USA leaves with after hearing your presentation on site?”
Paul: “Safety is about people.”

About Consolidated Grain & Barge
CGB has been an innovative and progressive leader in the grain and transportation industries since 1970, when it began modestly in a small office in St. Louis, Missouri with three employees. Today, CGB operates a global enterprise with over 2,500 employees overseeing a diverse family of businesses.

The company provides an array of services for grain farmers, from buying, storing, selling and shipping of the crop, to financing and risk management. CGB continues to be one of the largest shippers of grain on the inland river system.

Interview with Joe Corvello from American Bridge Company

Joe has been with American Bridge Company for 15 years serving in many capacities as a Project Manager, Quality Manager, Safety Manager and now to his current role as the Corporate Director of HSE with the overall responsibility of continuous improvement of their Safety Programs and Culture.

The culture of American Bridge empowers all employees to identify and correct behavior that is inconsistent with their vision of “zero-incident” workplace.  Safety is at the forefront of everything they do.

As an active leader in Safety for his industry, Joe volunteers his knowledge and skills to many organizations such as Construction Industry Safety Initiative (CISI), Bridge to Prosperity (B2P) and Global EHS Leaders.”

Interviewer: “What are the biggest challenges safety leaders currently face?”

Joe: “Getting Operations Management to engage with craft workers to reinforce positive behaviors.

Having individual workers take accountability for their own actions that may lead to injury or incident.”

Interviewer: “As a safety leader, what do you feel businesses continue to get wrong when it comes to their marketing strategy?”

Joe: “Companies need to view Safety as a VALUE, not a priority.  Priorities change based on operational needs.  Establishing Safety as a company value with strong communication will resonate a higher commitment by all.   Safety brings great value to a company’s reputation and will strengthen the bottom line.”

Interviewer: “What are the latest trends and behaviors you predict will be surfacing on the market over the coming 12 months?”

Joe: “Companies need to view Safety as a VALUE, not a Priority.  Priorities change based on operational needs.  Establishing Safety as a company value with strong communication will resonate a higher commitment by all.   Safety brings great value to a company’s reputation and will strengthen the bottom line.”

Interviewer: “What is the best piece of advice you have received within your job over the years?”

Joe: “Safety is a game that can never be won, you must play it to the best of your ability, always trying to outperform your last efforts, knowing that you gave it your all with the goal to go home each day free from harm.

My biggest goal is to someday work myself out of a job where every worker performs their work in the safest manner and that “Zero-Injuries” does become a reality for all!”

 

About American Bridge

American Bridge is a legendary construction company whose projects include a significant proportion of the world’s large bridges, marine installations, and other complex structures. Its history, project experience, safety leadership, reputation for integrity and competence, commitment to in-house development of human talent, equipment fleet, and above all, its advanced engineering technology, make the company unique in the entire world.

Key Metrics and Message mapping for CEOs

Ken Smith, Executive Director of EHS at the University of California, delivered a roundtable on “Key Metrics and Message mapping for CEOs”

A roundtable discussion on the three most important metrics that every CEO should know about their EH&S program. The participants were able to share the key performance indicators shared by their senior leaders and the three key message points that every CEO should be able to convey about their companies health and safety program.

ABOUT KEN SMITH
Ken Smith is the Executive Director for Environmental Health and Safety for the University of California. In this position with the UC Office of the President, Ken provides systemwide direction, guidance and expertise to all 10 UC campuses, 5 UC Health Medical Centers that encompass 11 hospitals, as well as Agricultural and Natural Resources and 3 UC managed National Laboratories on matters of Environmental Health and Safety. Ken has served the UC system for 25 years in the practice of Environmental Health and Safety. An alumnus of UC Santa Cruz, Ken received his degree in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Ken holds board certifications in both Industrial Hygiene and Health Physics. Ken is a nationally recognized expert in Health and Safety in complex academic and research environments. He has been an invited speaker for organizations such as the American Chemical Society, American Industrial Hygiene Association, The California State University System, the California Industrial Hygiene Council, and the Campus Safety Environmental Health and Management Association. Ken also serves on the boards of the Laboratory Safety Institute and the UC Center for Laboratory Safety.

How will new technology solve the hardest safety problems we face?

Max Rutz, Managing Director – Safety Strategy & Optimization, Delta Global Services (Delta Airlines) closed the OHS Leaders Summit USA with a presentation around “How will new technology solve the hardest safety problems we face?”

New technology will solve the oldest, hardest safety issues that we still face – and we don’t even exactly know how… yet. But, we can see the promise of new tech that is already here (or is on the horizon) that will change how we live and work, and can start to take action now to understand what’s possible, and see results sooner rather than later. Starting now means not needing to wait until these technologies are widely adopted, and we can partner with innovators to begin using this technology to solve our toughest problems today while also assisting in the development of what these technologies will look like in the coming years.

ABOUT MAX RUTZ
Max is the Managing Director for Safety Strategy at Delta Global Services. He is responsible for the development and implementation of key EHS strategies, analytics, and process improvements; as well as DGS’s EHS management framework and overall training implementation and compliance.

Sustainability – Setting long term, transparent targets to differentiate the company

Vinay Ramanathan, Head of EHS, Sustainability and Remediation, Nokia Corp delivered a presentation around  “Sustainability – Setting long-term, transparent targets to differentiate the company”

Following a decade of profound global shifts, including rising support for protectionism and populism, major advances in technology, and increasing environmental and social challenges, the term sustainability and corporate responsibility has caught on in the boardroom, courtroom and living room.

However, in an era of fake news, Whatsapp news and rising mistrust in the media, the creditability of the movement is under fire. As stakeholders become disillusioned and distrustful, sustainability reporting must prove itself – quantifiable goals, real achievements green or blue washing. And, all of it must be verified by an outside source.

This session will talk about how some companies are setting long-term, contextual, practical and transparent targets utilizing different approaches. It will cover:

  1. Market forces driving long term targets
  2. What is Science based targets
  3. How did Nokia go about setting long term targets?
  4. Reporting requirements and other considerations

ABOUT VINAY RAMANATHAN
With multiple years of management consulting experience, Vinay has a broad base of strategy and operational experience across large and mid-size companies, developing and implementing various transformational strategies such as business process outsourcing, organizational restructuring, strategic cost reduction, process improvement, and technology implementation.
 

Just and Fair Culture – Managing Compliance and Leadership

Patrick Hudson, Professor at Delft University, and Tim Hudson, Partner of Hudson Global Consulting, delivered a roundtable session on “Just and Fair Culture – Managing Compliance and Leadership”

This workshop examined why people break the rules and what you can do about it, using a state of the art model – Meeting Expectations. This model not only represents the most recent thinking about non-compliance, but also can be integrated into a model for Safety leadership. In particular the workshop explored the roles and responsibilities of workers, supervisors and management.

ABOUT PATRICK HUDSON
Patrick is a psychologist with wide experience of safety and management in a variety of high-hazard industries. Patrick has worked with the Oil and Gas sector, both upstream and downstream, commercial and military aviation, shipping, mining and hospital medicine. Patrick was one of the developers of the Tripod model for Shell, together with Jim Reason and Willem Wagenaar, better known as the Swiss Cheese model. Patrick was part of Shell’s team developing the theory of SMS in response to Piper Alpha and am now involved in teaching and developing SMS concepts in Civil Aviation, primarily in Asia and Australasia. Patrick developed the HSE Culture ladder, together with Dianne Parker and is now working on improving concepts of risk analysis in hospital medicine, transferring knowledge and experience between industries. Patrick is an Emeritus Professor at Delft University of Technology in The Human Factor in Safety at the Department of Safety Science.

ABOUT TIM HUDSON
Tim Hudson is a global thought leader in risk management and risk culture. Tim is currently engaged in developments in risk space and cultural theory understanding. In addition he consults in a range of industries including aviation, oil and gas, mining, and healthcare, where he has helped create true change within organisations as a partner at Hudson Global Consulting. A background in theoretical physics and business management enable a unique perspective on the challenges of modern operations.

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